TechyJar

Financial Exploitation of Elderly: A Guide for Older People, Carers, and Relatives

Jason Turtoga

TechyJar contains reviews that were written by industry experts and follow the strict reviewing standards, including ethical standards, that we have adopted. Such standards require that each review will take into consideration the independent, honest, and professional examination of the reviewer. That being said, we may earn a commission when a user completes an action using our links, at no additional cost to them. On listicle pages, we rank vendors based on a system that prioritizes the reviewer’s examination of each service but also considers feedback received from our readers and our commercial agreements with providers.

TechyJar contains reviews that were written by our experts, who examine the products in accordance with our professional standards. The reviews take into account the reviewers’ independent and honest evaluation of each product/service.

The reviews published on TechyJar are written by community reviewers that examine the products according to our strict reviewing standards. Such standards ensure that each review prioritizes the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, and takes into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings we publish may also take into consideration the affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website.

TechyJar is a user-focused website reviewing online privacy digital software such as antivirus, password managers, virtual private networks, parental controls, and other web services. Our professional researchers and technical product reviewers have been helping readers make informed decisions about how to start an online business and online privacy until 2023.

Jason Turtoga

TechyJar contains reviews that were written by industry experts and follow the strict reviewing standards, including ethical standards, that we have adopted. Such standards require that each review will take into consideration the independent, honest, and professional examination of the reviewer. That being said, we may earn a commission when a user completes an action using our links, at no additional cost to them. On listicle pages, we rank vendors based on a system that prioritizes the reviewer’s examination of each service but also considers feedback received from our readers and our commercial agreements with providers.

TechyJar contains reviews that were written by our experts, who examine the products in accordance with our professional standards. The reviews take into account the reviewers’ independent and honest evaluation of each product/service.

The reviews published on TechyJar are written by community reviewers that examine the products according to our strict reviewing standards. Such standards ensure that each review prioritizes the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, and takes into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings we publish may also take into consideration the affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website.

TechyJar is a user-focused website reviewing online privacy digital software such as antivirus, password managers, virtual private networks, parental controls, and other web services. Our professional researchers and technical product reviewers have been helping readers make informed decisions about how to start an online business and online privacy until 2023.

Financial exploitation of elderly is an abuse or scam targeting seniors. This financial scam results in massive losses. Elder people have taken a lifetime of effort and hard work to build savings and get retired. Due to multiple reasons, elder people are experiencing financial scam as the fastest growing elder abuse form. The type of cases varies from children taking advantage of their vulnerabilities to trusted financial advisors.

Table of Contents

According to an estimation by NCEA (National Center on Elder Abuse), elder financial abuse cost victims about $3 billion a year. Unfortunately, about 90% of the incidents occur from people victims trust and know closely. These typically include neighbors, caregivers, family members, or friends. (Source)

Losing money to fraud, exploitation, or scams can devastate older adults. It is mainly because they are not capable of earning it back anymore. Therefore, learning how to avoid and detect elder financial fraud is necessary, especially for older people, relatives, and carers. Here in this guide, you will get to learn every bit of how to avoid and detect scams targeting seniors here.

Explanation: Financial Exploitation of Elderly

Elder financial exploitation, also known as elder abuse or elder exploitation, is an abuse of financial resources’ misappropriation or financial control. The abuse harms an elder victim where the preparator is in a trust position.

This specific fraud type targets elder people only. A preparator can be someone the family trusts or a complete stranger. If the preparator is a stranger, the person typically contacts the elder person over the phone or online.

According to a report, above 200,000 elder fraud cases are reported every year by the authorities of the United States. The reported cases resulted in $1.17 billion worth of damages. Unfortunately, this is just one part of the entire story. (Source)

Elder Financial Exploitation: A Significantly Growing Form of Abuse

Elder financial abuse is growing significantly. Here are the key statistics that you should know about it:
  • Financial abuse has become one of the most common types of elder abuse. According to a US review study from 2017, approx. 5.6% of people in the broader community have experienced scams or frauds.
  • According to research studies, elder people who are residents of assisted living or nursing home communities experience a higher rate of elder fraud.
  • Elderly financial scam cases are reported in long-term care settings more frequently than in the broader community.
  • In case when the victim knows the preparator, financial losses are higher.
  • Reporting elder abuse financial exploitation is critical to get quick help and assistance.
  • As people grow older, they become a more attractive target for financial exploitation because they typically have collected assets and wealth throughout their lives.
  • Elderly people with cognitive impairment typically become a more attractive target for financial exploitation.

Email is the Most Common Source of Scams Targeting Seniors

Email is one of the most common ways elder people are targeted for this abuse.
The preparator utilizes typical phishing techniques against a large email address list with text aimed at elder people. The email content typically falls into any of the following categories:
  • Health or medical, including health coverage or discounted prescriptions.
  • Financial support such as retirement savings or home equity, etc.
  • Camaraderie or Friendship

Other than these, emails may also include other schemes that are highly targeted and may involve phone calls that are specific or personal. Regardless of the form of elderly financial abuse that happens, it can cause massive loss to your elderly family members.

Over time, different types of elder scams have risen. We may continue to experience this trend, especially if not prevented appropriately.

Who commits elderly financial exploitation more commonly?

Unfortunately, the most common preparators who commit scams targeting seniors are those you already know or trust. These typically include:

  • A caretaker may persuade or steal money from an elder person.
  • Neighbors can also benefit from older adults, especially those suffering from age-related memory decline or cognitive impairment. It is because neighbors typically know about the person’s mental condition and can pressurize or manipulate that person to get money.
  • Friends, acquaintances, or family members can also commit elderly exploitation. Sometimes, anyone close to a family member or friend of an elder person can also commit this crime.
  • Unscrupulous financial advisors, lawyers, or other professionals aware of the mental condition and financial condition of elder people can also commit elderly financial exploitation.

Important Steps of Elder Financial Abuse Successful Intervention

Here are a few primary steps that you must take to avoid and detect elder scams appropriately:

  • Prevention of Elderly Scams: Educate your elders, family, and carers to raise awareness about elder fraud financial abuse.
  • Recognition of Elderly Fraud Abuse: Spot the common warning signs and then take quick action to stop the loss.
  • Record an Elder Fraud Abuse: Document the observations you made.
  • Report Elder Financial Exploitation: Trigger appropriate responses by telling the right authority about the financial scam you have experienced.

In What Ways is Elder Abuse Financial Exploitation Carried Out?

Elder financial fraud may take many forms. This significant issue can turn into a significant loss if not identified promptly.

Some of the most common types of elderly scams include:

  • Theft of money
    Someone can steal cash from an elder person or withdraw money from the bank account or locker of the victim without their knowledge.
  • Cashing a check without any authorization
    Stealing or cashing the cheque of an elder person without their consent for financial gain.
  • Stealing money from credit cards
    Someone may use the credit card of an older person to make high-value purchases.
  • Misusing power of attorney
    Sometimes elder people assign power of attorney to someone they trust. However, the individual may misuse their authority for their financial benefit.
  • Identity theft
    Preparators may also use the credit history of an elder citizen to obtain credit cards or take out loans.
  • Investment scams
    In this type of financial exploitation of the elderly, the preparator will manipulate the elder person to make high-risk yet high-valued investments.

Examples of Financial Scams Targeting Seniors

Here are some common ways in which preparators conduct scams targeting seniors. These typically include:

  1. Investment schemes
  2. Charity schemes
  3. Grandparent scams
  4. Insurance scams
  5. Health scams
  6. Lottery scams
  7. IRS schemes
  8. Identity theft
  9. Reverse mortgage systems
  10. Romance scams
  11. Widow schemes
  12. Tech support schemes
  13. Account verification scams

The Emotional And Mental Effects of Elderly Financial Exploitation

Elder abuse financial exploitation doesn’t only affect your bank account; it can even affect your emotional and mental health. Here are the common emotional and mental effects that you may experience after an elder fraud:

Shame

You may feel embarrassed after getting scammed. You may hesitate to share the incident details with your family and friends. It is mainly because you feel ashamed as people will interrogate your wisdom or limit your financial freedom.

Anxiety

Once you have experienced financial abuse, you may experience to be hypervigilant. You will start feeling that the world around you isn’t safe enough. It sometimes also leads to the feeling that the world around you is sneaky, dangerous, or filled with people having ill intentions. Your self-confidence may also get shaken. You will feel like an easy target and more vulnerable to such incidents.

Anxiety after financial exploitation of the elderly will affect your physical and mental health differently. For instance:

Grief

After experiencing elderly financial exploitation, you might grieve your financial security loss, the people you trust, or your sense of freedom. The feeling is especially strong if a trusted friend tricked you or you have experienced a romance scam.

Victims may also cycle through numbness, despair, and anger’s feeling. Experiencing such emotions can make you self-isolate.
In addition, some of the elder people who experience financial exploitation may become anxious and avoid leaving the house. They feel ashamed to talk to their family and friends about what has happened to them. The experience can also make them feel too worn out to involve in a new relationship.
Loneliness can lead to various health effects, such as cognitive decline and depression.

Why Elders Are Targeted For Elder Financial Exploitation?

Elder people are disproportionately targeted for fraud and financial abuse as victims. One of the leading risk factors for exploitation of the elderly is having some type of cognitive problem. Whether the problem is mild or reached a more substantial problem like Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Memory or other thinking-related issues make elders more vulnerable to financial exploitation.

According to a study estimated in 2018, about 1 of every 10 elder people is a victim of elder financial fraud

Have you ever considered why the elder fraud abse rate is so high? Well, there are multiple reasons behind the problem. Let’s explore some of the most important ones. Here to learn more:

All Elder People Have The Same Common Issues

Elder people typically suffer from similar problems. Due to this, it becomes easier to phish elder people; preparators are aware of whom common problems. Most elder people share the same kinds of concerns. These typically include:

From the viewpoint of a preparator, crafting phishing emails revolving around these common issues always makes sense. They can easily create a few emails on these small topics to send emails to a larger recipients list concerned about them.

The Poor Capability of Decision-Making

As people grow older, it is common to experience diminished mental capacity. This problem can affect the decision-making abilities of elder people as well. Poor decision-making capabilities ultimately make them an ideal victim of elderly fraud abuse.

Elder People Trust Easily

Most of the elder people at present have memories of the time when there was no internet. Due to this, most of our loved ones have spent their life without using email and social media platforms. It ultimately takes a toll on them; they don’t know how much to trust people on email or the internet. They usually trust people on any platform more easily than other generations. Due to this, they become a victim of financial exploitation more easily.

Undue Influence

Another important thing that makes elder people an easier victim of financial exploitation is undue influence. Typically, all of us are influenced by our loved ones or people we have any relationship with. This influence sometimes impacts how we spend our money or make our decisions. Sometimes, elder people are inappropriately manipulated or pressurized. Some people with whom they are influenced may take advantage of their age-related memory problems or dependent conditions. Through such manipulative dynamics, preparators commit different types of elderly financial scam.

Poor Physical Health

Elder people who are suffering from poor health conditions and can’t complete their daily tasks themselves are more vulnerable to experiencing elderly financial exploitation. The risk factor is usually associated with depending on others to perform their routine tasks. More dependency can lead to elder people a higher risk of experiencing financial exploitation.

Age-Related Brain Pattern Changes

When people experience age-related brain changes, they trust others more easily. Research studies have shown that people become more optimistic as they grow older. However, the changes help them to stay happier but can also put them at a higher risk of getting financially exploited.

Cognitive Impairment

Cognitive impairment isn’t the necessary cause of financial exploitation of the elderly to occur. However, it can facilitate the process. In addition, if anyone recently has completed their power of attorney document, an impaired person’s agent can easily abuse their power of attorney or even mismanage an elder person’s funds for their benefit.

Many Older People Are Isolated

In most cases, elder people don’t speak to their family members, friends, or caretaker. Due to this, the rate of elder fraud is higher. In some cases, elder people are also isolated and don’t have anyone close to them with whom they can speak about something.
People typically believe that only rich older adults are at risk of financial exploitation. However, according to one research study, poverty is linked to financial exploitation.

In simple words, elder fraud abuse can happen to any elder adult. However, the risk of it increases when someone is isolated, dependent, or lonely. In addition, cognitive impairment can also increase elder people’s risk of financial abuse.

How to detect Financial Exploitation of the Elderly?

Preparators are ingenious but unethical people. Therefore, they use different types of methods to exploit others, especially older adults, financially. Recognizing the common financial abuse types is the first step to protecting yourself.
Here is how to identify the common traits of elder financial fraud scams to spot fraudulent activity.

Receiving Unusual Correspondence From Any Known Organization

Some preparators may try to gain your trust by introducing themselves as entities or organizations you already know. These may include well-known businesses or government agencies. They may send you different emails that feel legitimate. In addition, scammers may also try to direct you to a domain name that mimics official sites.
Besides, when you receive calls from these preparators pretending to be an organization, their caller ID doesn’t show.

Winning A Contest, You Didn't Even Enter

Perhaps, you may have received a message about winning a contest. Rethink “Whether you have entered for this.” Ask your family or friends if they have entered a contest on your behalf. If the answer is no, be aware it is a con artist.
If you are feeling the situation too well, it would be better to take a moment and rethink its legitimacy.

Getting A Call or Message About an Issue in Your Account

Online and call preparators often send you an email or message asking you to verify your information at a given link. Otherwise, your account will get blocked. They will ask you to correct the information to solve the problem in your account.
Get help from your family members and friends to ask if it is something to believe. You must read the message carefully. It is because such deceptive messages contain obvious grammatical and spelling errors.

Feeling Pressured To Take An Action

Preparators of different types always try to get your information and money without giving you time to think about it. If the preparator acts as a government person will threaten you with any impending legal action. However, if someone is impersonating your grandchild, they will ask you to send you money immediately because they are in an emergency. Similarly, a business impersonation may tell you to book a deal that is about to end.

Getting Odd Payment Instructions

Some of the fraudsters give you unusual instructions to make a payment. They may ask you to wire money or pay with a gift card. They can also ask you about any other unnegotiable payment mode. Always remember that legitimate entities provide different ways to purchase or pay your debt.

Being Asked To Keep Secrets

Sometimes an elder person may feel lonely and isolated. A preparator may ask you to start a relationship too quickly and then want to keep it secret. Similarly, someone mimicking your grandchild will also want you not to tell anyone else about your conversations. The goal of such preparators is to keep you from contacting anyone as it can expose their trick.

Different Ways to Prevent Elderly Fraud Abuse

Financial exploitation of elderly is the number one goal. Training and awareness are the best ways to prevent elder financial abuse. Some of the most important steps that can help you prevent further harm typically include problem identification in the early stages, documentation of the problem, and reporting.

Here we have described some efficient strategies that you must consider preventing elderly fraud abuse:

Typically, financial abuse is an ongoing problem; you can prevent further loss by identifying the problem at earlier stages.

Help Your Elder Loved Ones Avoid Online Scams

Making rash financial decisions is one of the most important aspects of protecting yourself against elder financial exploitation. Don’t respond to any demands or offers immediately. The practice is especially important if concerned about the contacting person’s legitimacy. Remember that any trustworthy authority or government agency never requires you to make rash financial decisions. However, here are some other tips that you must consider to teach elder people to avoid online financial scams:
  • Never click on suspicious attachments or links they receive in emails or messages.
  • Always ensure that their device’s security software is updated.
  • Never send money to anyone you don’t know or haven’t met personally, even if you have built a rapport online.
  • Be online acquaintances wary who profess their love quickly.
  • Whenever you are using any online services, check domain names properly. It is because preparators usually use websites with slightly different names to scam.
  • Remember that government agencies never initiate contact by text, email, or social media accounts.
  • Always keep your social account details private. Even if you have a public account, don’t share personal information there.
  • If you are unsure that a message is from a real business, such as a bank, then it would be better to visit their local branch or call their official number.

How to avoid phone scams?

Preparators also use phone calls or messages to exploit elders financially. Here are the key ways for carers, older people, and family members to avoid phone scams and prevent elders from financial exploitation.

Here is how to teach them to avoid phone scams:
  • If anyone pressurizes you to make a quick payment decision, ask them. You will respond later after thinking about it.
  • If someone claims to be your friend or family member, contact other close friends or relatives for surety. Getting help to verify the true information can be a better way to get help.
  • The caller ID isn’t always correct. It is because the preparator may spoof the real number to deceive you.
  • Don’t take unsolicited emails or calls claiming you have won a prize and ask for your personal information.
  • Never provide confidential information on a phone call, such as bank account details or social security numbers.
  • Ignore messages that ask you to pay to put money on the gift card.

Avoid In-Person Scams

Unfortunately, exploitation of the elderly can also happen in person. Here are the ways to help your elders to avoid in-person financial scams.

Avoid In-Person Scams
Ask your elders to:
  • Do not let anyone enter your place, especially when you are alone.
  • Never keep your valuable items or money in plain sight.
  • If someone claims to be a business and visits your place, get their details and tell them you will respond to their offer after researching it.
  • Never sign your cheque without leaving the payable amount blank.

Best Ways To Follow For Elder People To Protect Themselves

There are some effective ways in which elder people can protect themselves from being exploited financially. Here we have provided the most important practices to consider here:

Older People Should Stay Active Socially

Isolation is one of the key factors that can put an elder person at a higher risk of being exploited financially. It is because the condition can contribute significantly to the financial vulnerability of elder people. Isolation can cut them off from the outside world, making it harder for them to identify the warning signs. In addition, isolated elder people also start feeling they lack relationships and financial resources. Due to this, they become an easier target for preparators to feel financially secure.
Staying socially active is the best solution to avoid this from happening and prevent getting exploited financially.

They Should Avoid Opening Joint Accounts

Some elder people prefer opening joint accounts to make it easier for their family members to make withdrawals or payments on their behalf whenever needed. They consider this practice to make their financial management process easier.
Opening a joint account can also serve as an easier way for abuse or theft to occur.

Never Give Up Your Home

If you are an elder person and need to move into an assisted facility for living, don’t consider signing over your home to anyone, even if it is a trusted family member. This fact is especially truer if you consider letting someone else handle your home selling process.
Always remember that your home is the most valuable thing you have. Therefore, you should never give up your home to anyone, no matter what.

Invoke POA

If your ability to make financial decisions has decreased, you can be at a higher risk of becoming a victim of elderly fraud abuse. Consider invoking power of attorney as a proactive way to prepare for the assets and wealth future of someone. You must consider getting legal advice from a top source in this process.

Setting Up A Recoverable Trust Can Be Helpful

You can also consider setting up a recoverable living trust to protect your assets from outsiders. This practice will keep outsiders from accessing your assets of great value.

Learn About The Senior Safe Act

Even though senior citizens can ensure their protection in multiple ways, Senior Safe Act can also protect people against elder fraud abuse. This act encourages financial advisors and firms to report elder abuse financial exploitation.

The bill also protects these financial advisors from liability or privacy laws violation if they report elder financial exploitation cases.

Additional tips for you to prevent your elder ones from financial exploitation
Once you have identified the financial exploitation signs, there are some additional steps that you can consider to take. Let’s have a look at these to understand things better:

  • Stay involved in your elder loved one’s life
    One of the key ways to prevent elder abuse financial exploitation is to stay involved. Always be present for your elder loved ones and keep your involvement in their lives. Keep checking in with them regularly. Monitor their accounts, ask about their new or old friends, and keep an eye on any unusual activity.
  • Ask them to avoid providing their personal information to anyone
    Tell your elder family members to be extra cautious when providing their personal information to someone. This factor is especially important to consider when communicating with someone online or over the phone. It is because scammers more often use phone or email methods to access their sensitive information.
  • Help them with financial planning.
    You must participate in your elder’s financial planning activities. Take some time to help them develop an efficient financial plan aligning with their key financial objectives and goals. The practice will help your loved ones keep their finances on track. It will also help them to make more informed decisions regarding their finances.
  • Be careful when hiring a caregiver.
If your elder family member needs a caregiver, be careful. Always hire your caregiver from a reputable company. Always ensure you have due diligence before finalizing someone to enter your space. Don’t forget to perform a thorough background check. Asking for references is another effective practice to consider before hiring someone.
Help your loved ones when their cognitive changes start affecting their financial decisions.
When people grow older, they may start experiencing cognitive changes. These changes can affect their financial knowledge. It also affects their capability to make smart financial decisions. Due to this, it becomes common for them to make mistakes. When you learn about financial abuse, it might be late to recover from the loss. Therefore, taking precautionary measures is vital to take. If you are a child or grandchild with elderly loved ones, you must help them to make wise decisions, especially if they show any signs of confusion. Initiate a frank conversation to gain trust and build an action plan. Undertake your effort with another trusted family member’s support or get help from a trusted financial advisor.

Here are the tips that you must consider to help your loved one when their cognitive function declines:

  • Be present in the lives of your relatives. Encourage your elderly family members to stay connected with others socially.
  • Help your elder parents or grandparents to locate important documents, including financial account information, wills, tax returns, and debt documents. It would be better to include contact info and the name of their advisors, including accountants and lawyers.
  • Help your elderly family member gradually. You can schedule a bill payment set up and help them in automating their bill payment. You can also consider becoming their financial accounts cosigner.
  • Get credit reports to ensure that they aren’t identity theft victims.

Record and Report Financial Exploitation of Elderly

Whenever you have a suspicion, contact the related authority to document the incident and report elder financial abuse. Consult with your financial advisor to know how to document your financial abuse incident with time and date.

It is always better to document all your pertinent communications. These may include emails, phone calls, messages, etc. Investigators also need times, dates, locations, observations, etc. If the fraud has been done by a caregiver, the respective direct care or housekeeping team may also be familiar with the resident. Encourage them to provide the details of the required person and talk about your concern.

Laws for reporting a financial abuse incident are different for each state. Learn about your state and federal laws about reporting financial abuse.

State laws typically include financial exploitation definition, reporting requirements, criminal sanctions for reported elder abuse, and other guidance.

The primary agencies investigating elder abuse reports are licensing agencies, APS, long-term ombudsmen, and law enforcement. All states require you to report suspected elder abuse to APS or any other public authority.

Whenever you are about to report your elder abuse, be aware of what your state’s law requires from you to document the report. You must ensure to learn the following most important things about elder abuse.

These things typically include:

  • Whether you are a mandatory reporter to a public authority such as APS.
  • If you have additional reporting responsibilities to licensing agency or law enforcement agency.
  • In what duration is it imperative to report elder scams?
  • Who can get protective services?
  • Which of the agencies investigate elder financial abuse in your community?

Understanding the immunity provisions available in your state law is vital. Always reassure that you and your family members are safe harbors to report any elder fraud abuse.

State laws also have specific definitions for adults eligible for protective services.

Looking for all such information can make it easier for you to document and report your elder financial exploitation incident.

Take Care of Your Elders’ Mental Health

Besides protecting your elders’ finances, taking care of their mental health is also important. You should always take steps to ensure their mental healing, especially after they have undergone financial fraud. It is because financial fraud is always a traumatic event.

  • Following the financial abuse incident, your elder loved one may feel irritable, depressed, or numb. Their emotions’ intensity might swing constantly. It is a normal aspect of the grieving process. Don’t ask them to suppress their feelings. Instead, give them an outlet to vent their negative emotions.
  • Your elder may feel weighed down due to negative self-talk after experiencing financial exploitation. They may start considering themselves irresponsible or naïve. Reassure themselves that anyone can fall for financial abuse. Keep the blame on the scammer completely.
  • Help them to manage stress by using different techniques. Mindfulness meditation, visualization exercises, and muscle relaxation reduce stress. These practices can also be helpful if you experience trouble in falling asleep.
  • Tell your elder loved ones they don’t have to navigate their emotions alone. In fact, they should reach out to your trusted family member or friends. Ask them to connect with anyone comfortable sharing their experience; it might be healing for them.

Final Thoughts

Financial exploitation of the elderly has been becoming a serious concern, making victims lose billions of dollars every year. The problem has grown tremendously post-pandemic due to multiple reasons. Elder people are typically more vulnerable to financial abuse due to various reasons. These typically range from cognitive impairment to poor decision-making and memory issues.

Understanding the common yet important warning signs earlier can help you reduce your financial loss. In addition, it can also help caregivers, families, and senior citizens learn how to prevent their elder better-loved ones from being exploited financially. The best practices are to stay involved socially, create a financial plan, be cautious, and perform research when hiring a caregiver for your elder family member. Here in this article, we also have provided other essential yet practical tips that you can consider to protect yourself or your elder loved ones from experiencing financial exploitation.

Different Resources For Assistance

Various structures and organizations are available to serve elder people in case of financial abuse. Whether you want to access day-to-day resources or seek assistance or guidance to respond to fraudulent activity, these resources will serve as efficient help.

Here are some of the important resources you must look for when documenting and reporting an elder financial abuse case.

For instance:

  • If you are experiencing any decline in your account balance, it would be better to contact your bank.
  • Visit the NAPSA (National Adult Protective Services Association) to visit your state’s APS.
  • You can consider visiting Eldercare Locator. The United States administration provides this service. You can connect with the service to get help for older adults.
  • National Center on Elder Abuse is another helpful source to consider here. It will provide you with plenty of information about financial exploitation of elderly. The source helps get information but doesn’t allow you to report your elder scams incident.
  • You can also consider visiting the financial protection office specified for older adults. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau can provide information about navigating your financial challenges safely.
  • Elder Justice is a dedicated department of justice for elder citizens. The department provides detailed information on reporting financial exploitation and elder abuse incidents. You can find multiple local resources here by entering your zip code only.

State Elder Abuse Programs

 Maine

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-499-0229

Office of the Maine Attorney General

Phone: 
207-626-8800

Office of Elder Services

Phone: 
207-287-3707

 Maryland

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-332-6347

Department of Aging

Phone: 
410-767-1100

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
410-767-1100

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
410-576-6300

Massachusetts

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-922-2275 

Assisted Living/Community Ombudsman

Phone: 
617-727-7750

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-243-4636

Executive Office of Elder Affairs

Phone: 
617-727-7750

Office of Attorney General

Phone: 
617-727-2200

 Michigan

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
855-444-3911

Phone: 877-582-6995
 

 New Mexico

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
866-654-3219

Aging & Long Term Services Department

Phone: 
800-432-2080

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-432-2080

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
844-255-9210
 

 New York

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
844-697-3505

Office for the Aging

Phone: 
844-697-6321

Office of the Attorney General – Bureau of Consumer Frauds & Protection

Phone: 
800-771-7755

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
855-582-6769
 

North Carolina

Aging and Adult Services

Phone: 
919-855-3400

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
919-855-4800

Department of Justice – Elder Abuse Victims

Phone: 
800-662-7030

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
919-855-4800

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
919-855-4800
 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-522-2602

Oregon Department of Justice

Phone: 
503-378-4400

 Pennsylvania

Department of Aging

Phone: 
717-783-1550 

Office of the Attorney General – Protecting Seniors

Phone: 
717-787-3391 

Ombudsman Program

Phone: 
717-783-1550 

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
717-783-1550
 

 Rhode Island

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
401-462-3000 

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Protection Unit

Phone: 
401-274-4400 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
401-785-3340 

Division of Elderly Affairs

Phone: 
401-462-3000

 South Carolina 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
803-898-7601 

Office on Aging

Phone: 
803-734-9900 

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
803-734-3970

 Utah

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
801-538-3910 

Aging & Adult Services

Phone: 
800-371-7897 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
801-538-4171 

Office of the Attorney General – Financial Fraud

Phone: 
800-244-4636
 

 Vermont

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-564-1612 

Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living

Phone: 
802-241-2401 

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Information

Phone: 
800-649-2424
 

 Virginia

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
888-832-3858 

Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Phone: 
800-552-5019 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
804-565-1600 

Office of the Attorney General – Elder Abuse

Phone: 
804-786-4718
 

 Washington

Adult Abuse and Prevention

Phone: 
866-363-4276 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
307-777-2885

 Alaska

Department of Administration Office of Public Advocacy

Phone: 
907-334-5989

Alaska Department of Health and Social Services

Phone: 
907-269-3666

Consumer Protection Unit

Phone: 
907-269-5200

Stop Fraud Colorado

Phone: 
800-222-4444

AARP Foundation ElderWatch Colorado

Phone: 
800-222-4444

Colorado Coalition for Elder Right and Abuse Prevention

 Connecticut

Department of Rehabilitation Services State Unit on Aging

Phone: 
860-424-5274

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
866-388-1888

Connecticut State Department of Social Services

Phone: 
855-626-6632

 Delaware

Delaware Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
302-255-9040

Delaware Department of Justice Fraud & Consumer Protection Division

Phone: 
302-577-8600

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-223-9074

Delaware Money Management Program

Phone: 
302-857-5006
 

 District Of Columbia

DC Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
202-541-3950

DC Office on Aging

Phone:
 202-724-5626

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Protection

Phone: 
202-727-3400

Hawaii Executive Office on Aging

Phone: 
808-586-0100

Senior Medicare Patrol Hawaii

Phone: 
800-296-9422

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
808-587-0770

Hawaii County Office of Aging

Phone: 
808-643-2372
 

 Idaho

Idaho Commission on Aging – Elder Abuse Prevention

Phone: 
208-334-3833

Idaho Commission on Aging – Medicare Fraud

Phone: 
208-334-3833

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
208-577-2855

Office of Attorney General – Medicaid Fraud

Phone: 
208-334-4100

Office of Attorney General – Consumer Protection

Phone: 
208-334-2424

 Illinois

Adult Protective Services for Seniors

Phone: 
866-800-1409

Illinois Department on Aging

Phone: 
800-252-8966 

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-339-3200

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
800-243-5377

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-868-9095
 

 South Dakota 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
605-773-5990 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
866-854-5465 

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Information

Phone: 
605-773-4400
 

 Tennessee

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
888-277-8366 

Commission on Aging and Disability

Phone: 
615-741-2056 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
615-837-5112

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Protection

Phone: 
615-741-1671
 

 Texas 

Department of Aging

Phone: 
855-937-2372 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
877-323-6466 

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Protection

Phone: 
800-621-0508 

Adult Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation

Phone: 
800-252-5400
 

Aging and Long Term Support Administration

Phone: 
360-725-2300 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-562-6028 

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Issues

Phone: 
800-551-4636

 West Virginia 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
304-558-0628 

Bureau of Senior Services

Phone: 
304-558-3317 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
304-558-3317 

Office of the Attorney General – Senior Protection

Phone: 
304-558-1155
 

 Wisconsin

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
608-266-1865 

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
608-266-1865 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-815-0015
 

 Wyoming

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-457-3659 

Department of Health – Aging Division

Phone: 
307-777-7995 

Office of the Attorney General – Division of Victim Services

Phone: 
307-777-7200 

State Unit on Aging

Phone: 
402-471-2307

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
402-471-2307

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Protection

Phone: 
800-727-6432
 

 Nevada 

Aging and Disability Services

Phone: 
775-687-4210

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
775-687-4210

Office of the Attorney General – Senior Protection

Phone: 
702-486-3132
 

 New Hampshire

Adult Protection Program

Phone: 
603-271-7014

Bureau of Elderly and Adult Services

Phone: 
603-271-9203

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
603-271-4375

Department of Justice – Elder Abuse & Financial Exploitation

Phone: 
603-271-3658
 

 New Jersey

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
877-222-3737

Division of Aging Services

Phone: 
877-222-3737

Long Term Care Ombudsman

North Dakota

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
701-328-2538

Adults and Aging Services

Phone: 
855-462-5465

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
855-462-5465

Office of the Attorney General – Consumer Resources

Phone: 
701-328-2210
 

 Ohio

Department of Aging

Phone: 
800-266-4346 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-365-3112

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
800-282-0515
 

 Oklahoma

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
877-751-2972 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
405-521-6734 

Senior Legal Services

Phone: 
405-521-2281
 

 Oregon

Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations

Phone: 
503-945-5600

Seniors & People with Physical Disabilities Offices

Phone: 
541-967-8630 

This article contains

#1 Best Identity Theft Protection of the Month

With 24/7 Protection.

Was this article helpful?
0(0)